Penile Fracture

Can You Really Break Your Penis?

It actually IS possible to fracture a male’s penis. Although penile fractures are a rare occurrence for males, there is still a risk that individuals need to keep in mind throughout the course of their respective sexual lives. If excessive force or weight is applied to a fully erect penis, the fibrous coverings that envelop a male’s corpora cavernosa may rupture. The corpus cavernosa is one of two sponge-like regions of tissue in the penis that contain blood during penile erection. A penile fracture is more likely to occur if one partner is sitting on top of another during sexual intercourse. Avoiding penile fracture can be simple. Do not allow a rapid blunt force, such as aggressive vaginal intercourse or masturbation, to come in contact with an erection.  

Here is an example of a penile fracture:

                                         

The usual initial symptoms are the sound of a distinct pop or crack resonating from the erect penis, followed immediately by severe pain and an abrupt loss of erection. Bruising and swelling will occur shortly after a penile fracture. A male that experiences this kind of traumatic incident should immediately seek the attention of an urologist (a medical doctor who specializes in matters regarding the male reproductive system). In some cases, the urethra can be injured, as well the dorsal nerves, veins and arteries. A penile fracture is not the same as breaking an arm or leg. A penis cannot be placed in a caste. A penile fracture is a surgical emergency, and one should never hesitate to seek immediate medical treatment. Penile fractures can lead to scarring, deformity, and even erectile dysfunction.

Nuzzo, Regina (February 9, 2009). "Preventing penile fractures and Peyronie's disease - latimes.com". Los Angeles Times.

Andrew B. Peitzman; Michael Rhodes; C. William Schwab; Donald M Yealy, Timothy C Fabian (1 September 2007). The trauma manual: trauma and acute care surgery. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 305–. ISBN 978-0-7817-6275-5. Retrieved 18 April 2010.

Last updated: 8 February, 2013