Coprophilia

What is Coprophilia?

Coprophilia, also known as scatophilia or scat, is a type of sexual pleasure associated with feces.  Coprophiliacs enjoy either watching people defecate or defecating on someone themselves.  They also may like the smell, taste, or feeling/texture of feces in a sexual manner. Sexual pleasure can be derived from having the feces touch the skin or rubbing one’s genitals through the feces.  Others may enjoy just the feeling of feces as it exits the anus.  The eating of feces is known as coprophagia. The dangers associated with this sexual activity are infections, HIV, and hepatitis.

Little is known about the prevalence of coprophlia as a sexual activity, but it is most often associated with BDSM (bondage, discipline/dominance, sadism, masochism).  Typically within the context of these sexual relationships and encounters the dominant partner, or “top”, is the one defecating on or forcing the submissive partner, or “bottom,” to eat the feces as a way to humiliate them and demonstrate their dominance. Another way to partake in coprophilia is when the dominate partner does not allow the submissive to defecate without their permission, again as a display of dominance over their partner.

The connection of feces with sexual arousal and enjoyment may go all the way back to childhood.  Some children enjoy holding in a bowel movement and expelling it slowly under careful control. It also could be in connection with genital stimulation during the changing of diapers during infancy that eroticizes feces.

Because it is easy to transmit infections, HIV, and hepatitis A through oral or open-wound contact during scatophilic activity it is considered a risky sexual activity and is not recommended. There is, however, a small industry focused on the making of movies and art centered on coprophilia, sometimes referred to as scatology. Venturing into this visual arena would be a safer way to partake in this sexual play without risking the transmission of serious infection.

 

Last Updated 13 January 2013.

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