What is the average penis size? Is my penis too small? Too big?

What is the average penis size?

While penises come in various colors, shapes and sizes, studies have shown that the average penis size is anywhere from 5-7 inches. Here are the statistics on the percent of white college men who have erect penises of various lengths (According to the Alfred C. Kinsey Institute for Sex Research).

The same study found that the average girth is 4.84 inches.

Is my penis size too small?

Even if you were less than average, that would not mean that women would walk away with disappointment. A man can pleasure a woman in many ways - fingers, tongue and gentle hands, to name just a few (although I could go on). For many women, the penis is NOT what brings her to orgasm. Gentle stimulation around the clitoris is the thing most women like. Good sexual relationships do not depend on the size of your penis. They are enhanced by good communication, time, patience, understanding, acceptance and effective stimulation of the clitoris and nearby areas.

Is my penis size too big?

The only situation where you have to worry about your penis being too big is if it causes pain to your partner. If it does, you may need to be careful not to thrust too deeply during sex. There are a variety of sexual positions that may be useful to a male with a larger penis, which you can find on the Sexpert Approved Sex Positions article.

 
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How tight should a female's vagina be?

First, we would like to say that sexual performance and the size/width/tightness of your vaginal canal are factors oftentimes unrelated from one another. You need not worry about the tightness of your vagina and its effect on your sexual function or pleasure! Sex can be pleasurable for both you and your partner regardless of your vaginal “tightness.” However, many women have reported an increase in pleasure and sensitivity after practicing muscle tightening exercises called Kegel exercises, which work to strengthen your pubococcygeus (PC) or “pelvic floor” muscles. This suggests that having strong PC muscles (AKA a “tight vagina”) may have some advantages regarding sexual sensation because they can increase both male and female pleasure. A tight vagina can allow for more coital (penile/vaginal) friction, which in turn increases stimulation and the possibility of orgasm for both partners.

Sometimes, however, the vagina can be too tight and penetration may be difficult and painful for females. This condition is known as Vaginismus and is characterized by involuntary spasms of the pelvic floor muscles that surround the vagina. These spasms can make penetration impossible or extremely difficult. If you feel pain or discomfort during penetration, we would advise you to schedule an appointment with a gynecologist for proper diagnosis and treatment (vaginismus is treatable, so do not be afraid or disappointed if you are experiencing any of these symptoms).

Lastly, we would like to note that a female’s vagina might become “loose” (AKA her pelvic floor muscles have weakened) after giving birth, not merely from having many sexual partners or encounters. Again, these muscles can be strengthened/tightened through Kegels, which also aids in urinary control and stronger, longer lasting orgasms.

 
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What is PPP and what are some treatments?

Pearly penile papules (PPP) are small protrusions on the head of the penis, rimming the corona or “crown.” They are usually pearly or flesh-colored, dome-shaped, and smooth, ranging from one to three millimeters in diameter. These are not to be confused with HPV warts, which are contagious and spread via multiple forms of sex. Pearly penile papules, in contrast, tend to be uniform in shape and size and are arranged in neat circular rows. It is important to recognize the distinction between these two by visiting a dermatologist at a doctor’s office and getting tested for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) to ensure your skin condition is, in fact, pearly penile papules and not genital warts or another STI.

Pearly penile papules are very common; they are present in about 25% of adult males, and are harmless in nature. These bumps do not pose a risk to your health or the health of your sexual partner(s). They play no role in sexual performance and pose no health risk. For this reason, treatment is only advised if the bumps are a cause of psychological stress. If you decide to seek treatment, you should be sure to get a proper diagnosis from a doctor. Treatment is typically surgical removal of each papule via carbon dioxide laser surgery, radiosurgery, freezing, excisional surgery, or electro-desiccation. Other home remedies have also been used, although they are variable in effectiveness and should be carefully researched prior to use, as home attempts may be unsafe and can possibly worsen the appearance of the penis. These include applying gels or pastes such as toothpaste, castor oil, lemon juice, or eucalyptus oil to the papules for weeks at a time until the bumps seem to shrink in size.

Psychological distress from PPP is often experienced by men through feelings of low self-esteem or self-consciousness. While surgical removal may provide relief from such distress for some people, the high cost of surgery limits its access. Ads claiming to remove PPP in a short amount of time may be scams and should be avoided. The best advice for those experiencing psychological distress from PPP is to love your body. While it is understandable to feel some anxiety over a physical “abnormality,” especially when it affects such a delicate region of the body, acceptance and respect for oneself is inarguably the healthiest (and most cost-effective) mode of treatment.

 
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What are some common problems that occur with the male prostate?

Prostate-related illnesses are common amongst middle-aged men and should not be taken lightly. We highly recommend you see a doctor if you think you or anyone you know is experiencing any prostate problems.

There are a variety of common prostate-related health conditions, one of which is an enlarged prostate. Those suffering from an enlarged prostate (also referred to as benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH) may experience frequent urination, strained urination, a weak or slow urinary stream, dribbling of urine, or a constant urge to urinate throughout the night. Benign prostatic hyperplasia is most common in older men.

Another common prostate disease is prostatitis. Prostatitis involves inflammation of the prostate and/or the surrounding area. There are several different types of prostatitis with symptoms that range from mild to severe. If left untreated, prostatitis can greatly impact a man’s quality of life.

The last (and most serious) type of prostate disease is prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men (after skin cancer). Symptoms associated with prostate cancer include difficulty urinating or holding in urine; erectile dysfunction; blood in the urine; pain in the spine, hips, ribs, or other bones; weakness or numbness in the legs or feet; and loss of bladder or bowel control.

Doctors can use digital rectal exams and blood tests to help diagnose prostate-related conditions like enlarged prostate (BPH), prostatitis, and prostate cancer. These tests are often administered as a part of a man’s general health check-up, especially if he is over the age of 50. If you or someone you know is indeed suffering from a prostate disease, it is extremely important to consult a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

 
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What are some problems associated with ovarian cysts?

A common problem associated with ovarian cysts is amenorrhea, which is the absence of menstrual periods for longer than a year. The cessation of periods is often a sign of a problem with ovulation or another aspect of the menstrual cycle. Although missing periods can often mean that ovulation is not occurring, it is not completely correct to assume that a woman is infertile because she is not experiencing regular periods. We strongly recommend anyone who believes they have ovarian cysts visit a doctor as only a trained medical professional can determine the extent of her fertility.

 
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What is Sperm?

Sperm is the male reproductive cell. Sperm are commonly confused with semen but they are technically different from one another. Semen (also called ejaculate or “cum”) is the name of the entire body of fluid that is expelled from the penis during ejaculation, while sperm is one of the many components of semen. Although sperm may be considered the most “important” ingredient of semen because it is necessary for pregnancy, it makes up less than one percent of the volume of a man’s ejaculate. Sperm is created in the testicles in a process called spermatogenesis, then stored away until the sperm have matured and are ready to leave the body. When a male ejaculates, the mature sperm (combined with the rest of the fluids that make up semen) is expelled out of the urethra, located at the tip of the penis. The fluids in semen contain sugar to fuel the sperm through the vaginal canal and chemicals to activate the sperm to facilitate pregnancy. Not all of the sperm in semen are “activated,” or moving, immediately upon expulsion from the penis because the sperm would lose energy too quickly. To increase the chances of impregnating a female, only small groups of the sperm inside semen are moving at the same time. This process is the reason why a female can become pregnant for up to 5 days after a male has ejaculated inside her vagina.If sperm enters the female reproductive tract via the vagina and successfully fertilizes an egg, pregnancy occurs. If you would like to learn in more detail about the male reproductive system, please click here.

 
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I am a male experiencing puberty. Some of my friends have seen growth in their penises, and I have not. When and how will my penis start to grow?

 

Puberty is different for everyone and can begin as early as 9 years of age for some and as late as 14 or 15 years of age for others. During puberty, your penis will grow longer and thicker. However, like all changes that occur during puberty, penis growth occurs at different times and at different speeds for each individual. Therefore, if you are just beginning to experience puberty, it is likely that your penis is nowhere near finished growing.

    The first change that your genitals will undergo will be the enlargement of your scrotum and testicles (two sensitive, almond-shaped structures inside of your scrotum). After this change in scrotum size begins, your penis will begin to grow. In these beginning stages of puberty, your penis may grow in length, but not much in width. At this point, you may begin to grow pubic hair, which will thicken and become coarser over the span of puberty. Your penis will eventually thicken and begin to produce semen, allowing for ejaculation. Your penis will continue to grow throughout puberty and will not stop until puberty is over. For most males, this will be between ages 16-18, but some males have been known to experience puberty and penis growth into their early twenties.

    As penis growth occurs, you will notice changes that may come as a surprise. One of these new experiences that you may or may not have already encountered is an erection. An erection occurs when the structures in your penis expand and fill with blood and the shaft of the penis becomes hard. Erections are typically the most common in the morning, immediately after waking up, but they can occur spontaneously throughout the day or night. Many erections occur when you are not even thinking about anything sexual. Erections are a normal part of puberty that are nothing to worry about.  Something else that may occur throughout puberty are nocturnal emissions, commonly known as “wet dreams.” A wet dream occurs when you ejaculate (expel semen from your penis) in your sleep, and wake up with wet pajamas and sheets. Like erections, “wet dreams” are a normal part of puberty and usually stop when you get older. If you would like to reduce the amount of wet dreams you encounter, try masturbating to ejaculation right before bed.

    Penis growth and puberty occur at different times and at different speeds for each person. It is also important to note that penis size is genetic, just like the size of your hands or the color of your eyes. There is no such thing as a “normal” penis size. Keep in mind that penis size has nothing to do with your masculinity or your sexual ability (if you are a heterosexual male, please know that the majority of nerves in a female’s vaginal canal are actually located at the very opening of the vagina, so the length of a penis is oftentimes irrelevant for providing female pleasure). If this worry persists, we encourage you to talk to your parents or doctor about the different stages of puberty.

 
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